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Two Poems: Baby of the Mistaken Hue & It Creeps Back In

  From our Memory Issue, two poems by Patricia Smith. Baby of the Mistaken Hue   Baby of the mistaken hue, child of the wrong nose with its measure unleashed, baby of the nappy knot, I am your mother. Mad at your whole damned face, I swear to the task of torching the regrettable Delta […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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How to Tell If You Are a Literary Dick Disguised as a Pee You Ess Ess Why

From our recent Tribes issue, Thomas Sayers Ellis slams “the muzzled blank verse of symmetrical whiskers.” How to Tell If You Are a Literary Dick Disguised as a Pee You Ess Ess Why aaa for Walrus   After you’ve feasted on Christians and caesuras, “Style,” is what you call your cage, “Style,” as if, structurally, […]

Posted in Poetry

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The Art of the Sentence: Elizabeth Bishop

Every medium has its limitations, and the central limitation of writing is that readers can only apprehend one word at a time, in order. Because of this, we are denied the grand simultaneities permitted to other arts. A symphonic chord, with its dimensions of harmony and tone color and dynamics and duration, can be heard […]

Posted in Art of the Sentence, Poetry

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When I Was About Your Age

 From our Memory Issue, a poem by Caroline Knox. When I was about your age, ffff my great aunt, who was the librarian of Vassar College, gave me an old navy-blue book, The Oxford Book of English Verse. It was from 1942. Back then, it was amazing that a girl could have a major librarian […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Existential Scavenger Hunt

From Issue 44 aaaa Existential Scavenger Hunt aaaa Salt Lake City, I love yr Mormon versions of my favorite gay men, tailored to make me nostalgic for pussy & God!                   Both come in hundreds of flavors—cowboy, purple-haired, crying   at a Sex Pistols concert. I could have loved them all. The purple-haired one tasted […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Oyster Bar

As we get set to welcome Will Butler to Portland this Sunday, we thought we’d share his contribution to last year’s Summer issue.   Oyster Bar A businessman blowing an octopus for the pure taste of the sea. A glad man eats a writhing fish— fingernails scrape out a cheek. Through a cut in the […]

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The Tin House Podcast: Making The Black Dog Sit, with Matthew Dickman

In his 2011 Summer Workshop lecture titled “Making The Black Dog Sit,” Tin House poetry editor Matthew Dickman tackled the complicated subject of suicide by examining poems which engaged with the often misunderstood act, illuminating how the shadow of suicide affects both the life of the artist and his or her work. ggggg Using poetry as […]

Posted in Podcasts, Poetry, Writers' Workshops

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2015 Winner of The Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Gregory Pardlo

Everyone here at Tin House is excited to give a giant congratulations to Gregory Pardlo upon the announcement of his book “Digest” receiving the 2015 Pulitzer Prize. We were honored to publish his poem “Philadelphia, Negro” in our 2012 Winter issue.   Philadelphia, Negro   Alien-faced patriot in my Papa’s mirrored aviators that reflected a […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Game of Totes: A Song of Myself

“I swear to you, sitting a throne is a hundred times harder than winning one.” —some probably dead king Yesterday’s big announcement may have drowned out some of the excitement around Electric Literature and Vol. 1 Brooklyn’s epic Game of Totes competition. The best of the best literary tote bags were brought before a panel […]

Posted in Poetry, Tin House Books

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Second Empire

It’s time for another entry in our digital broadside series recognizing poets under thirty years old via poems under thirty lines. This week Richie Hofman brings us the title poem from his upcoming collection. Second Empire   The water, for once, unmetaphysical. Stepping over the stones, you pulling   your shirt over your shoulders. The […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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Of Amplitude There Is No Scraping Bottom: An Interview with Jane Hirshfield

The poems in Jane Hirshfield’s The Beauty take measured steps across a wooden floor. Rolling between the real and the remembered, the interior and the exterior, The Beauty cuts to the heart of our shared existence.While I’ve always been a fan of the tenderness and mystery in Hirshfield’s work, there’s something about these new poems and essays that go even deeper. Released in tandem […]

Posted in Interviews, Poetry

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The Do-Over: An Interview With Kathleen Ossip

Kathleen Ossip’s The Do-Over, her fourth book of poems, is a study in poetic crosshatching as it slashes moments of recollection and longing with that of inquiry and curiosity. The speaker functions as a character within her own life, a character in the life of long-lost relatives, (too old for her to remember), and a […]

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Goodness

It’s time for another round of Broadside Thirty, our showcase for poems in thirty lines or less by poets thirty or younger. Today, we present a new poem by Soren Stockman. Goodness   She lies across your legs, open to the open window, and after promising not to ask, does not. She tells you to […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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Dimension 5

From our Science Fair issue, Donna Hunt dons an identity crisis. Dimension 5 ddd In this dimension you are not in love with me anymore. I wish it were another. In infinite dimensions you are not in love with me. Those donnas handle it better. Other donnas accept the cycles of relationships. Some donnas dye […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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The Rapture

From issue #44, Christopher DeWeese gets all puritan on us. The Rapture When they take all the lovers out of this park only you and I will be left as well as the flowers. We won’t be bewildered: we’ll ransack picnics, thousands of them until darkness touches everything at once, a perfume only poor women […]

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Absolution

It’s time for another round of Broadside Thirty, our showcase for poems in thirty lines or less by poets thirty or younger. Today, we present a new poem by Zoe Dzunko. Absolution   I adopted the voice of somebody very hungry before a mountain of choices, and never stepped out of her. How unfair that […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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The Girl Banned from Saying No: On the Death of Shaimaa el-Sabbagh

Like many of you, we here at Tin House have just learned of the death of Egyptian poet Shaimaa el-Sabbagh. Ms. Sabbagh, age 31, was shot down by masked riot police while trying to place flowers in Tahrir Square on January 24th.

Posted in Poetry

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The Tin House Podcast: How to Write a Hoax Poem, with Kevin Young

Kevin Young drops by our classroom to discuss some of the more notable modern poetry hoaxes, glimpsing into the secret history of the poem as something conceived to tempt or even trick. By understanding the ways the hoax works, Young suggests that we may better know our own assumptions, habits, and hurts, and how to […]

Posted in Podcasts, Poetry, Writers' Workshops

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The Melting Process

The Melting Process, a new poem by Molly Dickinson.

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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The Tin House Podcast: The Furniture Appears to be Dreaming, with Matthew Zapruder

We kickoff 2015 with “The Furniture Appears to be Dreaming,” Matthew Zapruder’s attempt to spectacularly fail, for once and for all, to define poetry. In this lecture, first given at last summer’s workshop, Matthew tackled metaphor, so-called “poetic” language, and explored the differences between poetry and prose. Other topics covered included Keats, chimney sweepers, Bishop, line […]

Posted in Podcasts, Poetry, Writers' Workshops

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The King Won’t Kill Me

From issue 46, Winter Reading. gg   The King Won’t Kill Me gggg today. He’s cleared the court, torn up the last treaty, trounced the villages bordering the empire’s southern- most state, shackled their dark denizens and given the hundred skinniest to split among his governors. I wore shackles once on a boat across the […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Secret and Invisible Folds into the Visible

Time for another round of Broadside Thirty, our showcase for poems in thirty lines or less by poets thirty or younger. This time around, we present a new poem by Elisa Gonzalez.   SECRET AND INVISIBLE FOLDS INTO THE VISIBLE after Augustine   Lately I have been lullabying myself to sleep with erotic fantasies. Familiar […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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The Doubling of Self: An Interview with Richard Siken

It has been ten years since Richard Siken’s first collection Crush was selected for the Yale Series of Younger Poets. Since its release, I have turned to Crush many times to take pleasure in the images and voices that populate its poems. Pleased to discover that Copper Canyon Press will soon release his second book War of […]

Posted in Interviews, Poetry

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Hector

It’s time again to plaster the digital streets with Broadside Thirty, our showcase of poems in thirty lines or less by poets thirty or younger. This installment features Jameson Fitzpatrick.   HECTOR at the window throwing the keys down in the doorway in black athletic shorts legs the same shape as yours but thicker with […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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The War Came As If a Dream

Welcome to the second installment of Broadside Thirty, our new feature for young poets. Each digital broadside will feature one poem under thirty lines by a poet under thirty years old. Today we feature a poem by Michael Prior. The War Came As If a Dream Our children volunteered our eyes, for they had seen […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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