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In the Museum of What I’ve Been Thinking

This whole night was Cannot Sleep and so you watched the bedroom window in the mirror and waited. Curtains rose and fell. Imagined sailing, and for a minute the bed was a boat to pilot, but the floor’s stagnant water and you ran aground. Outside, the streets are dark and darker. When I say you […]

Posted in Poetry

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The Best Greek God Is Us

THE BEST GREEK GOD IS US a few seconds ago I was watching a video in which the head of a person. crossing a street was cut off from the frame to make the viewer  wonder. whether it was a man or a woman or a human – either way I thought – well, isn’t […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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Fire

As we continue to take applications for our upcoming fiction and nonfiction coastal workshops, we have been rolling out a series of posts featuring our stellar faculty. Today we get close to the heat with Nick Flynn’s poem from our Evil Issue. more the idea of the flame than the flame, as in: the flame of […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry, Writers' Workshops

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The Tin House Podcast: Building The Emotional Image, with Natalie Diaz

“An image is more than what we show our readers–it is story, it is history, it is emotion. When we seek the perfect image, we filter our writing and cut ourselves off from the possibilities of meaning and emotion–the things that make both the writer and the reader feel.”- Natalie Diaz In this craft talk, […]

Posted in Podcasts, Poetry, Writers' Workshops

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Because It’s October

  BECAUSE IT’S OCTOBER and I’m watching ambulance lights bathe a motel and not thinking about the loose glitter my body is, because everything inside me isn’t rattling like a change purse, not splitting into smaller versions of itself, small enough to be threaded through the eye of a needle, I think my brain is […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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Columbus Day

In tribute to the one Chris Columbus we at Tin House can get behind.

Posted in General, Poetry, Videos

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Winehouse

  From Issue #58, a poem by Kevin Young.   Winehouse   I’m sick of Maybe, my baby daddy. Folks, I’m fed up with loss. With lists. First place with a bullet. My shoulders bear   Valerie, Valerie   a picture of my mother. Let us lose one another, our tattoos the only reminder. Far […]

Posted in From The Vault, General, Poetry

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I Like Weird-Ass Hippies

When we reach the other world
We will all be hippies
I like your weird-ass spirit stick that you carry around
I like when you rub sage on my door

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Remembering C.K. Williams

I first met Charlie Williams during a poetry festival at Sarah Lawrence College the summer my first book came out. I was there with my brother Michael and our poetry mentors Dorianne Laux and Joseph Millar. I was excited and nervous to meet this man who had written so many poems that seemed to, and […]

Posted in General, Poetry

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Two Poems: Baby of the Mistaken Hue & It Creeps Back In

  From our Memory Issue, two poems by Patricia Smith. Baby of the Mistaken Hue   Baby of the mistaken hue, child of the wrong nose with its measure unleashed, baby of the nappy knot, I am your mother. Mad at your whole damned face, I swear to the task of torching the regrettable Delta […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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How to Tell If You Are a Literary Dick Disguised as a Pee You Ess Ess Why

From our recent Tribes issue, Thomas Sayers Ellis slams “the muzzled blank verse of symmetrical whiskers.” How to Tell If You Are a Literary Dick Disguised as a Pee You Ess Ess Why aaa for Walrus   After you’ve feasted on Christians and caesuras, “Style,” is what you call your cage, “Style,” as if, structurally, […]

Posted in Poetry

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The Art of the Sentence: Elizabeth Bishop

Every medium has its limitations, and the central limitation of writing is that readers can only apprehend one word at a time, in order. Because of this, we are denied the grand simultaneities permitted to other arts. A symphonic chord, with its dimensions of harmony and tone color and dynamics and duration, can be heard […]

Posted in Art of the Sentence, Poetry

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When I Was About Your Age

 From our Memory Issue, a poem by Caroline Knox. When I was about your age, ffff my great aunt, who was the librarian of Vassar College, gave me an old navy-blue book, The Oxford Book of English Verse. It was from 1942. Back then, it was amazing that a girl could have a major librarian […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Existential Scavenger Hunt

From Issue 44 aaaa Existential Scavenger Hunt aaaa Salt Lake City, I love yr Mormon versions of my favorite gay men, tailored to make me nostalgic for pussy & God!                   Both come in hundreds of flavors—cowboy, purple-haired, crying   at a Sex Pistols concert. I could have loved them all. The purple-haired one tasted […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Oyster Bar

As we get set to welcome Will Butler to Portland this Sunday, we thought we’d share his contribution to last year’s Summer issue.   Oyster Bar A businessman blowing an octopus for the pure taste of the sea. A glad man eats a writhing fish— fingernails scrape out a cheek. Through a cut in the […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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The Tin House Podcast: Making The Black Dog Sit, with Matthew Dickman

In his 2011 Summer Workshop lecture titled “Making The Black Dog Sit,” Tin House poetry editor Matthew Dickman tackled the complicated subject of suicide by examining poems which engaged with the often misunderstood act, illuminating how the shadow of suicide affects both the life of the artist and his or her work. ggggg Using poetry as […]

Posted in Podcasts, Poetry, Writers' Workshops

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2015 Winner of The Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: Gregory Pardlo

Everyone here at Tin House is excited to give a giant congratulations to Gregory Pardlo upon the announcement of his book “Digest” receiving the 2015 Pulitzer Prize. We were honored to publish his poem “Philadelphia, Negro” in our 2012 Winter issue.   Philadelphia, Negro   Alien-faced patriot in my Papa’s mirrored aviators that reflected a […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Game of Totes: A Song of Myself

“I swear to you, sitting a throne is a hundred times harder than winning one.” —some probably dead king Yesterday’s big announcement may have drowned out some of the excitement around Electric Literature and Vol. 1 Brooklyn’s epic Game of Totes competition. The best of the best literary tote bags were brought before a panel […]

Posted in Poetry, Tin House Books

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Second Empire

It’s time for another entry in our digital broadside series recognizing poets under thirty years old via poems under thirty lines. This week Richie Hofman brings us the title poem from his upcoming collection. Second Empire   The water, for once, unmetaphysical. Stepping over the stones, you pulling   your shirt over your shoulders. The […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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Of Amplitude There Is No Scraping Bottom: An Interview with Jane Hirshfield

The poems in Jane Hirshfield’s The Beauty take measured steps across a wooden floor. Rolling between the real and the remembered, the interior and the exterior, The Beauty cuts to the heart of our shared existence.While I’ve always been a fan of the tenderness and mystery in Hirshfield’s work, there’s something about these new poems and essays that go even deeper. Released in tandem […]

Posted in Interviews, Poetry

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The Do-Over: An Interview With Kathleen Ossip

Kathleen Ossip’s The Do-Over, her fourth book of poems, is a study in poetic crosshatching as it slashes moments of recollection and longing with that of inquiry and curiosity. The speaker functions as a character within her own life, a character in the life of long-lost relatives, (too old for her to remember), and a […]

Posted in Interviews, Poetry

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Goodness

It’s time for another round of Broadside Thirty, our showcase for poems in thirty lines or less by poets thirty or younger. Today, we present a new poem by Soren Stockman. Goodness   She lies across your legs, open to the open window, and after promising not to ask, does not. She tells you to […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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Dimension 5

From our Science Fair issue, Donna Hunt dons an identity crisis. Dimension 5 ddd In this dimension you are not in love with me anymore. I wish it were another. In infinite dimensions you are not in love with me. Those donnas handle it better. Other donnas accept the cycles of relationships. Some donnas dye […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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The Rapture

From issue #44, Christopher DeWeese gets all puritan on us. The Rapture When they take all the lovers out of this park only you and I will be left as well as the flowers. We won’t be bewildered: we’ll ransack picnics, thousands of them until darkness touches everything at once, a perfume only poor women […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Absolution

It’s time for another round of Broadside Thirty, our showcase for poems in thirty lines or less by poets thirty or younger. Today, we present a new poem by Zoe Dzunko. Absolution   I adopted the voice of somebody very hungry before a mountain of choices, and never stepped out of her. How unfair that […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, Poetry

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