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Michael: An Essay

It so happens that Michael Woodcock, whose painting St. Joseph’s Day appears as the cover of The Sleep Garden, also designed the cover of my first book of poems, a lifetime ago. It’s my hope that what follows will let others know how important he was to me and to everyone who knew him.  * […]

Posted in Essays, From Tin House Books, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

Under the Aegean Moon

On the Aegean coast of Turkey, the sea casts rainbows at olive trees, and mountains stretch eagerly into the open water, creating sheltered coves. My American husband and I arrived in one of these inlets soon after our wedding in Istanbul—though we live in Brooklyn, we were married in Turkey where most of my family […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

On Pandering

This essay, which is featured in our forthcoming Winter issue, was originally given as a lecture during the 2015 Tin House Summer Writers’ Workshop. It was met with enthusiastic applause.  Some Exposition fff Until recently I was a professor at a private liberal arts university in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, a little town located at the exact point […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 49

My Uniform

Cheryl Strayed will be speaking with Diana Nyad at Wordstock on November 7th. For now, enjoy her mini-essay from our Memory Issue. There’s a pair of pants I wore almost every day for the first five years I knew my husband. They were what I like to call sport pants, which differ from all-out sweatpants (or yoga […]

Posted in Essays, From the Magazine

Comments: 0

Haunted Reading

As I walked the eerily empty streets of downtown Spartanburg the evening before my reading, I imagined good old boys morphing into slimy reptiles, conducting human sacrifices, and wallowing in bloodbaths, their scales glistening with gore.

Posted in Essays, From Tin House Books, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

The Story of a Bird

Before you go into the grave
Don’t forget to write to me with your ashes
Don’t forget to leave your underworld address

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction, Poetry

Comments: 0

Padgett Powell on Donald Barthelme

Don Barthelme once said to me, “The trouble with teaching is you spend all your time working on someone else’s rotten manuscript when you should be working on your own rotten manuscript.” This is signature Barthelme. It contains the making of a joke by repeating two syllables or two words or two phrases, at which […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

St. Mark’s Bookshop

When I was 16 I discovered subculture and went at it voraciously.

Posted in Essays, From Tin House Books, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

Our Endless Numbered Days: A Summer Field Guide

How well do you think you would survive in the wild with only an axe and a knife?

Posted in Essays, From Tin House Books, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

Two Truths and a Lie: What do Fiction Writers Take from Life?

In middle school we all played it – you did too, right? The game where each person tells three facts about themselves, except that one of those “facts” is made up, and it’s the responsibility of the other players to tell the difference between them. Think about a reverse form of Apples to Apples, in […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

Distance

I am eight. The lights of the farm across the road from my home are an archipelago of hovering dots. Moos float disembodied in blackness, startling me. White noise in the dark night. My father works there. The family business, generations old, the farm Upstate. He is inside one of those lights, birthing a calf. […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 1

Trains, Planes, and What I Read

When I travel, once I’ve rounded up my documents and stuffed the carry-on to bursting, the last thing I pack is a book. I slip whatever I have chosen between my change of clothes and my blanket, and close the zipper. I appreciate that e-books have, for some people, erased the need to make an […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 2

Reader, Meet Writer; Writer, Meet Reader

When my book, Our Endless Numbered Days was published I didn’t think I was going to enjoy getting out there and talking to strangers.

Posted in Essays, From Tin House Books, Nonfiction

Comments: 1

Around the Corner

Once, as a child, I almost saw a man kill himself. The boys up at the wall looked down at him as he, weeping, put his head on the tracks. I stood back, watching them as they watched him. Or that’s how I remember it, but I also remember his face, so I’m not sure […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

The Roots of King Kendrick

In his groundbreaking book, Roots: The Saga of an American Family, Alex Haley tells the story of Kunta Kinte, a young man from Gambia sold into slavery in America in the 18th century. The book—published in 1976 and adapted into a popular television series in 1977—is largely based on true events and real people, as […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

Dear E

From our Rejection issue, Leslie Jamison looks back on the geometry of junior high friendships. November 15, 2014 Dear E, Who were we kidding? Back then, friendship was nothing but musical chairs. You’d steal anyone’s spot if it meant you got a seat. Or at least, I would. I did. This was fourth grade. You were […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 1

Tin House Staff Rejections: Clandestine Supermarket Lobster Liberation

Just to prove we have skin (if not submissions) in the game, we asked our staff members to recall a time in their lives when they were dealt a heaping hot slice of rejection pie. To read more lengthy responses to the prompt, check out our latest issue, which is filled with sad sack tales, […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 4

On Teaching Nicholson Baker

Why You Should Teach Two Books, Each of Which Could Get You Fired

Posted in Essays, From Tin House Books, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

We’ll Make It

Giant hail, spontaneous combustion. I’m twelve. My mom is annoying, but I love her. I need to keep her safe, so I try to imagine all the ways she could die right now: She could have a seizure and drive into the river. A dog could dart into traffic causing us to swerve into a […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

Tin House Staff Rejections: Manic Panic Fuchsia Shock

Just to prove we have skin (if not submissions) in the game, we asked our staff members to recall a time in their lives when they were dealt a heaping hot slice of rejection pie. To read more lengthy responses to the prompt, check out our latest issue, which is filled with sad sack tales  […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

Our Endless Numbered Days

It always seems to surprise readers that writers don’t have a huge amount of say in the covers of their books.

Posted in Essays, From Tin House Books, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

Tin House Staff Rejections: Blow Log

Just to prove we have skin (if not submissions) in the game, we asked our staff members to recall a time in their lives when they were dealt a heaping hot slice of rejection pie. To read more lengthy responses to the prompt, check out our latest issue, which is filled with sad sack tales  […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 1

Dear Gordon Lish

From the hot-off-the-presses Rejection Issue, here is Mitchell S. Jackson on being rejected by his onetime mentor, Gordon Lish. Jackson will join Rejection Issue-mates Paul Beatty and Ann Hodgman at the New York release party at KGB this Sunday, March 1 at 7:00pm. Dear Gordon: You know where we come from: jet trips from Paris […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 2

How I Came to Live Here

We drove through Oakland, a desultory meander along the estuary in the warehouse district where the Port boom cranes line up in a string of white horses and the big freighters hug the shore waiting to be relieved of their cargo so they can turn around and get more on the other side of the […]

Posted in Essays, Nonfiction

Comments: 0

First Catch Yourself A Squirrel

“I can get you a squirrel next week,” my accountant, Julian, said.

Posted in Essays, From Tin House Books, Nonfiction

Comments: 4