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The King Won’t Kill Me

From issue 46, Winter Reading. gg   The King Won’t Kill Me gggg today. He’s cleared the court, torn up the last treaty, trounced the villages bordering the empire’s southern- most state, shackled their dark denizens and given the hundred skinniest to split among his governors. I wore shackles once on a boat across the […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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To Psychic Underworld

From our 2010 Winter Reading issue (#46), Dan Chaon’s To Psychic Underworld. Critter was standing outside the public library with his one-year-old daughter in his arms when he saw a dollar bill on the sidewalk. It came fluttering by, right next to his tennis shoe, carried by the wind along with a leaf. He hesitated […]

Posted in Fiction, From The Vault

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Tomato Pie

All of us at Tin House were thrilled to hear the news that Ann Hood’s essay “Tomato Pie” was included in the 2014 Best Food Writing collection. First appearing in our Memory issue, the essay concludes with a wonderful recipe that most of our staff indulged in over the summer. This includes Tin House executive editor […]

Posted in Essays, From The Vault

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Animati

From our 2010 Summer issue (#44), Paul Griner’s “Animati.” We were going to surprise him from the closet. He was going to be surprised when we jumped out, there was no doubt about that. He was just a temporary extension of us, and besides, we’d told him we couldn’t come. It was dark, and our […]

Posted in Fiction, From The Vault

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Paradise

Tin House is thrilled to congratulate the poet Jay Nebel for recieving the 2014 Saturnalia Books Poetry Prize. Chosen by poet Gerald Stern, Nebel’s book “Neighbors” is a guide to the underworld of neighborhoods, family life, friendship and addiction. These poems are full of the blood and guts that make up our smallest interactions as […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Texas, Being

where blind catfish cruise / limestone caverns // from deeper we drink / while a man sweets tea

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Poem for Wine

We’re all emerging from whatever reclusive hole we burrowed into after the end of our Writer’s Workshop, facing the light of day with bleary eyes, wondering who these strangers are who walk the streets. When we close our eyes, though, we still see visions of debauchery and beauty in equal measure. We’ll let workshop faculty […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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The Sadness of the Yankees Fan

During yesterday’s fourth straight loss for the New York Yankees, we were reminded of this David Shields poem, from Issue 43, Games People Play. May the “gorgeous dream” never die . . .   THE SADNESS OF THE YANKEES FAN   The sadness of the Yankees fan lies in his knowledge that his gorgeous dream […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Who Needs Us?

A rather gloomy spring day here in Portland has us going back to an essential question, last asked by Dorianne Laux in Issue 42. ggg Who Needs Us? hhhh The quiet, the bitter, the bereaved, the going forth of us, the coming home, the drag and pull of us, the tome and teem and tensile […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Two by Charles Wright

Today, the Library of Congress names Charles Wright as the new Poet Laureate of the United States. In honor of Charles’ well-deserved title, here are two of his poems from Issue 39, Appetites. ONLY THE I CHING HEXAGRAMS ARE LACKING   Unlike despair, happiness knows no final answer. As one who has carried discontent Like […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Total Utter Madness: A Story of Soccer

As Thursday brings us the the 20th installment of the World Cup, we look back on writer Michael J. Agovino’s personal history with the sport that will come to dominate global discussions for the next month.

Posted in Essays, From The Vault

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Essay on Urban Homesteading, a Poem

A poem from the Wild issue.

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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The Order of Things

From Issue 49, The Ecstatic, Jay Nebel speaks of the spiders we often find within the predictable order of things. I hate spiders. There, I’ve said it. I hate walking face and teeth and nose into their webs while they spin and wrap and suck the blood out of flies. My mother brushes them into […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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A Conversation with Chimamande Ngozi Adichie

In light of news that Chimamande Ngozi Adichie features on “Flawless,” a new track from Beyoncé, we present Adichie in conversation with critic Parul Sehgal, from Issue 56.

Posted in From The Vault

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A Toast to Mary Szybist

A Poem by Mary Szybist

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry | Tagged , ,

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3′ x 9.999˝

From Issue 53, The Portland/Brooklyn Issue, a reminder of why we love our Portland poets, even after they leave. hhhh 3′ x 9.999˝   Remarking remarks on a peg republic of wall, I can resist my own weight on braided wire. Double it, in the eggy heath.   Tinny whack to the dowel, occurring flat […]

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The Weigh-In

From issue 43, The Games People Play x x The Weigh-In In retrospect my legs were long, two strong cylinders that pushed me up the stadium steps, my body bound with plastic wrap, the time running down. I liked to be under direction and duress, the stress of the short tick of the clock, the […]

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A Man of His Times: Revisiting Alan Sillitoe

From Issue 30, Winter Reading Alan Sillitoe’s writing is uniquely musical, but it is a street rhythm, located in the English postindustrial town of Nottingham. His quick-witted dialogue parallels the quick thinking his characters need to survive. Their inner monologues, however, seethe with anger at those who circumscribe their lives, and with a constant ache […]

Posted in From The Vault, Interviews

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Pound, Drunk on A Forty, Goes Off

This mid-summer day we bring you back to Winter Issue 30, where Jillian Weise’s potent and imploring words make our spine tingle in the cool of our air conditioner.    Pound, Drunk on A Forty, Goes Off by Jillian Weise   See here, what are all these birds doing in your verse, am I to think flight or fear? […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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Wild Plum

In honor of the mysterious  stranger who left a box of plums on our office doorstep, we bring you this quiet gift from Issue 39. hhhh Wild Plum ggggg by Jane Hirshfield llll A gray squirrel tests each plum with his nose, moving from one to another until he feasts.   It is like watching […]

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Sheepshead

Continuing a weeklong celebration of some of our favorite staff contributions to the magazine over the years, Michelle Wildgen learns to play cards like sausage and discovers a Wisconsin tradition in the process. aaaa From our Games People Play issue. Something strange happened to me the second time I moved to Wisconsin. I’ve lived here […]

Posted in Essays, From The Vault

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Sex & the Single Squirrel

Continuing our weeklong celebration of some of our favorite staff contributions to the magazine over the years, we get a little dirty with Elissa Schappell’s trip to a furrie convention. From our Sex Issue. *No animals were harmed in the making of this essay (we think).* hhhh Sex & The Single Squirrel gggg I have […]

Posted in Essays, From The Vault

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On David Markson

Kicking off a weeklong celebration of old content some our favorite staff contributions to the magazine over the years, we revisit Rob Spillman’s slice of David Markson, which originally ran in our 10th Anniversary issue.  David Markson is going down fighting, and he’s not giving an inch to convention, zeitgeist, or potential sales. Born in […]

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Smudge

This living brushstroke of a poem by Thomas Sayers Ellis was written in response to David Stern’s paintings at the Yeshiva University Museum in New York City. Sayer’s haunting language comes together, a graphite blurring, smearing and distorting, bringing us through the words on the page and into an eddy of ink, pooling into sinister, […]

Posted in From The Vault, Poetry

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What We Hunger For

Before devouring our Summer Reading issue next month, follow us back to Summer Reading 36, where author, Douglas Bauer, looks back on the life of food writer, Mary Frances Kennedy Fisher. Bauer remembers the week he met Fisher as a young man, when she inspired in him a profound hunger.   I am, as often, tempted to start a […]

Posted in From The Vault

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