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Thanksgiving

  Fictional writers got more than they bargained for last week. They sparred with disgruntled protagonists, relived their memoirs, and reckoned with that minor character they killed off in Chapter One. Congratulations to the winner of Week Three, Carolyn Oliver, whose poignant “Thanksgiving” reminded us the story is never over.  Check out this week’s prompt […]

Posted in Fiction, Flash Fridays, General

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Tender

From This Means War (Issue #55) TENDER Dear patriot Dear catastrophe None of this means what we thought it did   Dear bone fragments Dear displacement Dear broken skin I am in over my head   Dear prisoner Dear, dear wounded You have earned our respect   Dear glad hands, curbed dog Dear perfect object […]

Posted in General, Poetry

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On the Election

—Langston Hughes All of us at Tin House are enraged and saddened by the election. Now, more than ever, we believe in the power of story, in empathy, in inclusion, and that all voices have the right to be heard. Don’t give up hope. Fight back against racism, homophobia, isolationism, misogyny, Islamophobia, and the lie […]

Posted in General

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See You On The Other Side

We are off to drink away the pain of this campaign watch the results. See you tomorrow. We hope.

Posted in General

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Beneath the Red Cap: An Interview with a Hillary Hater

“Why don’t you trust Hillary Clinton? Say it out loud, please. I want you to hear your answers.”

“She wants it too much?”

“She’s too ambitious?”

“Too ambitious?”

“Is that a problem for someone running for president, to really want to be president?”

Posted in Fiction, General

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Wordstock Week: Kevin Young

“…All night long
at the Hold’em table
we’ll gamble it all
like tin men hoping
for hearts.”

Posted in General, Poetry

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Brown Dog and Gee

She wasn’t going to the hospital again, no way. It smelled like pee there and her mother always yelled at her to stop kicking her foot against the leg of the chair while they waited for the doctor. She didn’t like the hospital, despite what her dad said: “Well, for not liking it, you sure […]

Posted in Fiction, Flash Fridays, General

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Days of Never Before

January 22
Walking son to school we pass an old pay phone and I suggest we call someone. He asks me who we should call. I say we should probably call me and find out how I’m doing. I put two quarters in and dial my cell number. No sound. Dead line. The phone took the money. Won’t give it back.

Posted in General

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Gone Collecting

This variety of spider is born dead, Noll told us. Stiff packets of chitin and darkness. Teensy tiny organs rattling like dried beans if we listened with the right tools (which Noll had). Out-of-state scientist come with his white van and silver knives to explain to us what our forest held. Only when someone warmed […]

Posted in General

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Lost & Found: Pamela Erens on George Gissing

If you’re a writer who’s ever felt sucky about your pitiful advances, the lack of reviews for your books, or your inability to place your literary work altogether, you will finish reading New Grub Street feeling much, much better. Because in the Golden Age of the Novel, things were actually much, much worse.

Posted in General, Lost & Found

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On the Couch, with Steve Almond and Aimee Bender

From our 2009 Summer Workshop, Steve Almond and Aimee Bender—both the offspring of therapists—discuss how and why less experienced writers manage to sabotage their own fiction. Among the topics covered are: simplicity phobias, the artistic unconscious, OMD (obsessive metaphor disorder), fear of emotional exposure, prose envy, and obfuscation in the service of the id.  

Posted in Craft, General, Podcasts, Workshops

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Learning Paris

TODAY’S PICTURE was from the Musée d’Orsay: the bright, vaulted windows, gilded finishings, and me, smiling underneath. I thought I’d have time to see most of the museum before the kids’ school let out, but I moved too slowly among the impressionists, then had to hurry with the rest. I did stop for several minutes […]

Posted in Fiction, Flash Fridays, General

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Life Expectancy

Life Expectancy  It’s 2016, just after gravity’s first speech. Here I am, lying in the dirt, attempting to sense the rotation of an earth I imagine to be singular in space. I watch the breathable take shape, though my eyes are inadequate, poised between nanobes and primitive galaxies. You’ll find me at my sewing machine, […]

Posted in Broadside Thirty, General, Poetry

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Women Taking Charge

I want a female main character with power. And I want her to do harm, because there’s no story without trouble.

Posted in General

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Pleasure Kid

“You’re like a radiant corpse,” she said to the man in her bed. She had wanted to say it for days. “I know,” he said brightly, looking up from his book. He was older than she was. “I get exhausted,” he explained. “I really do. But then I get excited.” “Then you forget your body,” […]

Posted in Excerpts, Fiction, General

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What Was Your Favorite Color Growing Up

If you walked into that house you’d think you’ve just walked out of it. It always smells like toast. Toast and fertilizer. There are a lot of green plants around but none of them are alive, unless you believe plastic breathes, and the man in there does. He does tai chi after breakfast every morning […]

Posted in Fiction, Flash Fridays, General

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Jeebie Jeebie

The boyfriend’s girlfriend used to speak to him like he was a baby. She would come up to him stringing nonsense sounds together like “jeebie jeebie” or “newmoo newmoo” and hug him or pinch his cheeks. After she bought the dog, however, the girlfriend stopped talking to the boyfriend like he was a baby. Instead, […]

Posted in Fiction, Flash Fridays, General

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American Dream

The wrestler emerged from the kitchen, the weight of a coal-burning grill in both hands, and I felt like clapping. The “barbecue” was more Korean yakiniku than tabletop Coleman, and it had landed in the middle of our table. With a fork, he speared a hefty cube of pig fat and rubbed it back and forth across the burner, until it sizzled and oozed and I possibly audibly ahh’d. His assistant poured, from a burnished kettle, an herb-fragrant broth into the moat that surrounded the smoking coals. The wrestler slowly lifted an egg above his head and brought it down with a crack! on the metal tureen. Strands of gold and milky white raced into the broth, swirling and solidifying in the steaming brew.

Posted in Carte du Jour, General

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Unpacking My Lesbian Library

When we went to see the trailer we’d rented, officially Uhauling, it was clear immediately: our books weren’t going to fit. I had eighteen boxes. She had eighteen boxes. The shipping would cost over a grand and so we reconsidered. We were moving the cheapest way possible, to a new state where neither of us […]

Posted in Essays, General

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Termites Never Sleep

Taking my hand, he led me through the Louisiana Swamp Gallery to a verdant artificial garden. Arias of brightly colored canaries were locked in a cages along the wall. Holly stood on a plastic bridge and butterflies filled the air. An immense azure morpho landed atop her head. She knelt down to show Zion its palpating wings.

Posted in Essays, General

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A Favor

I look at her bed and imagine her in her faded nightgown, lying sleepless, a thin arm outstretched to my father’s bed alongside her.

I look at his bed and see his pillows smoothed and propped up, his sheets tucked tight, his blanket folded at the foot.

Posted in Flash Fidelity, General

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The Eagle at the Lake

In college, just as I was starting to think of myself as a writer—also known as my “insufferable” phase—I felt a vague anthropological obligation to interview the elderly people on my mother’s side of the family. I figured I only had a couple of years, tops, before they all died. My uncle’s parents, for instance, […]

Posted in Essays, General

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We All Must Live by the Rules

Literature, read on the sly, gave the author her first taste of the strange world of that mysterious being, the adult.  From Issue 63, Rejection.  What I remember is a park in Boise, a summer picnic in the late 1960s, and my father lurching to a stop on the sidewalk to let a girl pass. […]

Posted in Essays, From the Magazine, From The Vault, General

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In Bowling Class, I Think of Dad Taking Things Three Months at a Time

In Olympia, my father

to whom I will not speak,

whose face heavies with the shrinking

ledger of days,

plants azaleas after surgery, the grooves

in his fingers filling with soil

and mercy.

Posted in Broadside Thirty, General, Poetry

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Poetry Month Gems

April is National Poetry Month, so we thought we’d check in with our staff for some poetry recommendations. Where better to start than with Matthew Dickman, our Poetry Editor: Matthew: I can’t stop reading work by Khadijah Queen. Her poems are dynamic, ecstatic, and important. Copies of her books Fearful Beloved and Non-Sequitur are never […]

Posted in Desiderata, General, Poetry

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