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Fierce Creatures of Sherwood Forest: Alan Sillitoe’s The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner

I had been running away, feeling useless under the malarial symptoms of my first semester at college: alternately giddy and nauseated, my gut churning from several indigestible love affairs I’d left behind in Oregon. Sick of myself and all my self-referential classmates, I bounced restlessly around my parents’ house looking for something to moor myself […]

Posted in Lost & Found

Comments: 3

A Dark Dreambox of Another Kind

Alfred Starr Hamilton (1914-2000), whose poetry has just been resurrected by The Song Cave in the collection A Dark Dreambox of Another Kind, is an embodiment of a recognizable fringe, the outsider artist. The outsider, a familiar if not always friendly creature, is often little unhinged; she—I take up the feminine pronoun in honor of […]

Posted in Essays, Lost & Found

Comments: 1

The Wasp Factory

I was twelve years old when I saw a man nearly die.  At the time I lived in downtown Reno, on a city block near a porn theater, pawnshops, boarding houses, and casino lights.  When I wasn’t visiting my mother in the downtown jail—where she worked—I stayed close to home, exploring and inventing and wondering, […]

Posted in Lost & Found

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The Georgia Wonder

n an era when the average person didn’t differentiate between electricity and magnetic force, which many believed transited the human body as a fluid, William Hurst bet the farm on his daughter’s desire for attention. He put her on the national circuit for almost two years, predicting correctly that her pretense of weird science would attract the paying public in droves to witness the dangerous forces emanating from the hands of his Magnetic Girl.

Posted in Lost & Found

Comments: 1

Hot Line: The Letters I Get… and Write!

Burt Reynolds can often be found in wrestling singlet or head-to-toe denim, gazing skyward and guffawing at his dizzying good fortune. He has his soulful moments, too. He likes to peer out a window, bare-chested and holding a highball. I suspect he may have been mentally preparing himself for the final photos, which display him—nude but for a ranger’s hat and cigarillo clamped between his teeth—astride a hand-shaped chair.

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G. K. Chesterton’s Father Brown Stories

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Endless Highway

Was Carradine really so desperate for money or attention that he had to make nice with a bunch of rubbernecking plebs? Apparently not. He didn’t make nice at all. He sat there doing a crossword, head and eyes down, oozing hostility, daring anyone to approach.

Posted in Lost & Found

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Three Cities

What struck me most about Three Cities was its core philosophy, that anti-Semitism is a non-Jewish problem. “In every drop of the ocean all the attributes of the whole ocean are contained, for the ocean consists of drops,” says one of the novel’s characters, according to a Talmudic saying. Similarly, for Asch, the fate of the lowest tier of Russian society, the Jews, becomes a barometer for the viability of an entire nation. Time and time again, by screwing the Jews, Russia’s leaders end up screwing themselves.

Posted in Lost & Found

Comments: 1

Miami and the Siege of Chicago

Tom Grimes on Norman Mailer’s Miami and the Siege of Chicago

Posted in Lost & Found

Comments: 0

My Life As A Man

L&F: Philip Roth

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Failing Paris

Janet Finch on Samantha Dunn’s Failing Paris

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Comments: 0

The Williamsburg Trilogy

Jonathan Lethem on Daniel Fuch’s Williamsburg Trilogy

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Comments: 7

Near to the Wild Heart

Anderson Tepper on Clarice Lispector’s Near to the Wild Heart

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Comments: 3

The Dud Avocado

Elisa Albert on Elaine Dundy’s The Dud Avocado

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Comments: 10

Lost & Found: Sara Roahen

“Lamb for Eight Persons Four Times is not simply a recipe. It is a way of life,” Capon writes, convincing me again and again that as long as we remember to cook with economy and a full spirit, we’re going to be okay.

Posted in Lost & Found

Comments: 5

Lost & Found: David Gates

David Gates introduced us to Dolly Freed’s cult classic of way,-way-off-the-grid living, Possum Living, back in our first issue. We liked the book so much we ended up reissuing it. Here’s David’s original paean to Possum. I found Dolly Freed’s Possum Living (Universe Books, 1978) in the attic of the fixer-upper farmhouse I bought in […]

Posted in Lost & Found

Comments: 0

Lost & Found: Hugh Ryan

When, in my reading, I found hints of a gay man born in 1900 who swam the Panama Canal, crossed the Alps on an elephant, and made the first recorded winter ascent on Mount Fuji, I was determined to read every word he’d written.

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Lost & Found: Helen Schulman

Instead of the cliché of a picture-perfect Sabbath dinner disrupted by storm troopers, Badanes paints a rich and disturbing portrait of an already tattered family further unraveling as it faces annihilation.

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Comments: 4

Lost & Found: Jim Shepard

When she debuted, with her first novel, Raven’s Croak (!), she was a sixty-two-year-old retired knitting teacher from a rural backwater.

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Comments: 1

Lost & Found: Steve Almond

We’re back today from the Tin House Writer’s Workshop and feeling a bit like kids fresh off the bus from summer camp: smarter, braver, and already wistful for the quesadillas in the Reed cafeteria the time we spent immersed in this thing we most love with some of our favorite people who love it, too. […]

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Lost and Found: Alice Elliott Dark

Alice Elliott Dark offers a masterclass on Jane Bowles’s short story “A Stick of Green Candy” in this Lost & Found from Tin House #12. It is hard to write well about children. Most often, we portray them as prototypes of ourselves; we trace who we are back to that smaller version of us, the […]

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Lost & Found: Hugh Ryan

Hugh Ryan introduces us to the zombie’s first cameo in American literary consciousness–and to an author whose life story rivals that of the undead for drama–in this Lost & Found on adventurer, occultist, and discerning cannibal W. B. Seabrook’s The Magic Island. I’m a sucker for a good monster-origin story.  What’s Cujo with the rabies, […]

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Comments: 5

Lost & Found: Tonaya Thompson

Tonaya Thomspon proffers a vision of Sylvia Browne, said psychic’s 500-year-old “Aztec/Inca” spirit guide Francine, and her best ghost hunting advice (“NO ALCOHOL OR DRUGS BEFORE OR DURING TRANCE.”) in this Lost & Found from Tin House #47: The Mysterious. I discovered Sylvia Browne in the early nineties, after dropping out of my first try […]

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Comments: 3

Lost & Found: Brian James Barr

Baseball is no place for freethinkers, which is why Bill Lee never fit in. Unafraid to voice his opinions, he called George Steinbrenner “a convicted fellow” and said the Oakland A’s were “emotionally mediocre.” He told reporters he sprinkled marijuana on his buckwheat pancakes.

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Lost & Found: Francine Prose

Francine Prose has been gracing the pages of Tin House for as long as we’ve had had pages to grace. This Lost & Found on Rebecca West’s A Train of Powder appeared in our inaugural issue. Catch Prose’s latest dispatch for us, a Lost & Found on Annie Ernaux, in our new summer issue. If […]

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