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Lost & Found: Jacqueline Alnes on James Galvin

In Galvin’s book, the land is not only a physical place. It is also an escape, a “property of the mind,” a character, and a palimpsest on which people over time have written their stories and seen them dissolve.

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Lost & Found: Matthew Specktor on Eve Babitz

Babitz serves the beauty of her subject and manages to write about Los Angeles—that Los Angeles of hipsters, actors, producers, musicians, managers and maître d’s—both as someone subject to its laws and lures and as someone comfortably above them. Addressing her own beauty, which was no slouch, Babitz writes, “The truth is that when you’re as voluptuous and un-hairsprayed as I am, you have to cover yourself in un-ironed muumuus to walk to the corner and mail a letter. Men take one look and start calculating . . . where the closest bed would be.”

Posted in From The Vault, Lost & Found

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Lost & Found: Michelle Blake on Sarah Orne Jewett

Jewett was born in South Berwick, Maine in 1849, and though she traveled widely, she always returned home. As a child, she didn’t like school and was often ill, so her father, a country doctor, would take her on his rounds. She credits him with calling to her attention the speech and dress and customs of small town life. “Don’t try to write about people and things,” he told her. “Tell them just as they are.”

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Lost & Found: Cheryl Pappas on Colette

I wondered why the book hit me so hard. I stopped taking it with me on the subway, because at one point, there I was in the corner seat, wetting the pages with my tears. Maybe it was because their library dining room recalled my little studio, or because the new flowers on their crabapple tree reminded me of the bursting blossoms on the magnolia tree outside my window. But the most likely reason I felt keenly pierced by the account of such a love was because it deepened a loneliness I often pretended not to feel.

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Lost & Found: Kenneth R. Rosen on J. R. Moehringer

A True Mirror’s reflection depicts a person as they are seen by others. It’s a curious novelty. Stand in front of one and you see yourself, your true self, staring back. Too worried about what it would reveal, I myself have never viewed one. The closest I have come to having this experience, to accepting […]

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Shit from the Sea

This was the rancid sea slug at the center of Lindbergh’s beautiful, whorled book: this idea that somehow separation, an embrace of solitude is the path toward joy. For me, it was the source of my life’s greatest anguish. A Gift from the Sea gave best-selling bonafides to my mother’s notion that she was an island, an island too small for the two of us. Thanks to this goddamn book, I had been cast away.

Posted in Essays, Lost & Found

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Lost & Found: Noh Anothai on Karl Adolph Gjellerup

It could be that few in the Western world have heard of Danish-born novelist and playwright Karl Adolph Gjellerup, much less his “legendary romance” Der Pilger Kamanita (“The Pilgrim Kamanita”), for which he co-won the prize in 1917. But come to Thailand, where the novel was translated in 1930, and you might think it were the product of native genius: the text is excerpted for high school curricula and listed on the Ministry of Education’s top 100 books all Thais should read in full.

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Lost & Found: Navtej Singh Dhillon on Khushwant Singh

Towards the end of the novel, the magistrate asks if there are any Muslims left in Mano Majra. “Astray Muslims,” as he calls them, suggesting that something neat and surgical had happened, as though the British cartographers had drawn clear lines. But the incisions were bloody and, seventy years after, the injuries persist. For most people, the novel introduces a foreign land. For me, it familiarized a land and people I thought I knew. Where the story of Partition ends in Mano Majra, it begins in countless small places like Khanpur.

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Lost and Found: Daniel Hornsby on Helen Waddell’s Translation of The Desert Fathers

Reading the Fathers’ book and hearing my mother’s testimony, I felt moved by the longing for a kind of truth I found in both accounts. It is this, the lonesome striving for truth and goodness, that I so admire in my mother. Together, they have helped me to understand religion as a language for the ineffable, not simply as an excuse for uniforms or hateful protest.

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The Jewel Heist

From our Theft Issue, the tables turn as Mary Higgins Clark gets robbed.  Eighteen years ago, I decided to insure my jewelry. I realized that over the years I had gradually accumulated valuable rings, necklaces, bracelets, and pins. The reason for my treasure trove was that every year when I turned in the latest book […]

Posted in Lost & Found, Poetry

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Lost & Found: CJ Evans on Thomas James

More than thirty years ago Thomas James shot himself in the head, but this isn’t about that. When I was twenty-seven, Lucie Brock-Broido gave me, like she had given countless other poets over the years, a poorly xeroxed copy of James’s Letters to a Stranger, but this isn’t about that either. As I read him […]

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Lost & Found: Cassandra Cleghorn on Kenneth Patchen’s Jazz Collaborations

For seventy-nine recorded seconds in 1957, poet Kenneth Patchen and a group of jazz musicians achieved a perfect melding of minds and biorhythms. A few years before, Patchen had begun a series of collaborations, performing and recording with the Chamber Jazz Sextet in San Francisco, the Bed of Roses Chamber Group in Seattle, the Alan […]

Posted in Essays, General, Lost & Found

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Lost & Found: Shane Danaher on Sterling Hayden

A passionate sailor, striving writer, and unwilling movie star, Sterling Hayden lived a picaresque life in which his nascent internal struggles were compounded by the American century in which he lived. The chief literary artifact of this extraordinary existence, Hayden’s mid-life autobiography Wanderer, published in 1963, distinguishes itself amongst its genre through its formal imitation […]

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Lost & Found: Robert Anthony Siegel on Yasunari Kawabata

I find it by accident, pressed between two large volumes on the shelf. Though it has been over twenty-five years, I recognize it instantly: a mere sliver of a book, about half the size of an American trade paperback, with tan card-stock covers smudged from handling. This is my copy of Yukiguni—in English, Snow Country—by […]

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Shawn Donley, Powell’s Books

Welcome to Tin House’s Bookseller Spotlight, a series of interviews with indie booksellers across the country. Up this week is Shawn Donley with Powell’s Books . Tin House Books: What was the first book you read that made you fall in love with reading? Shawn Donley: I grew up in a small town in Pennsylvania and like many small […]

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Lost & Found: Gabrielle Gantz on Tove Jansson

I came to Tove Jansson’s work late in life and in a backward fashion. Most people familiar with the Finnish author and illustrator know her as the creator of the Moomins, a family of hippopotamus-like creatures first introduced in a children’s book series in 1945 and then adapted for a comic strip. The tales of […]

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Lost & Found: Steve Almond on Per Olov Enquist

The Visit of the Royal Physician, which I cannot stop reading, sometimes even long enough to eat a yogurt, begins like so: On April 5, 1768, Johann Friedrich Struensee was appointed Royal Physician to King Christian VII of Denmark, and four years later he was executed. Why do I find this opening line—an unvarnished statement […]

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Lost and Found: Kate Schmier on Roy Hoffman

As a young reader, I had a fascination with stories of the American South. Maybe it was because of my favorite English teacher, Mrs. Clark, a Georgia native who taught To Kill a Mockingbird, and whose black-rimmed glasses and gray pixie cut made her look very much like the author. Or maybe it was because […]

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Lost and Found: George Estreich on Dale Evans

There are dozens of memoirs about raising children with Down syndrome, hundreds of blogs, a galaxy of status updates. But in the beginning was Angel Unaware. Angel Unaware was written by Dale Evans and published in 1953. Evans, an actor, celebrity, and writer, was married to Roy Rogers, with whom she starred in movies and […]

Posted in General, Lost & Found

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Lost and Found: Alexandra Kleeman on the Poetry Bot RACTER

Reading RACTER’s poems and stories makes you feel as if you are looking at yourself from a great distance, through the lens of a cognitive system that produces meaning and comparisons mechanically, without reference to familiar combinations that make “good sense.” It’s a feeling like the one I used to have sitting in front of my computer alone, late at night, chatting with preprogrammed bots: a sort of intimation or trail that led outward, into the machine, and then, ultimately, back to myself.

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Lispector Week: Anderson Tepper on Near to the Wild Heart

Anderson Tepper on Clarice Lispector’s Near to the Wild Heart

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Lispector Week: Kim Adrian on The Passion According to G.H.

In honor of the upcoming New Directions release of Clarice Lispector’s Complete Stories, we decided to hand The Open Bar keys over to the Brazilian legend. Tune in all week for previously unpublished and newly translated stories, as well as reviews and thoughts on her work. Today, Kim Adrian unpacks The Passion According to G.H. […]

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Lost and Found: Cheston Knapp On C. P. Snow and John Brockman

From our Science Fair issue, Cheston Knapp on C. P. Snow’s The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution and John Brockman’s The Third Culture: Beyond the Scientific Revolution. I was born into a house divided. In college, Mom studied history and English, and Dad did biology. Growing up, when we needed help with our homework, […]

Posted in From The Vault, Lost & Found

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Lost and Found: Leslie Jamison on Charles Jackson

As you get ready for your Mad Men Weekend, we thought we’d roll out Leslie Jamison’s look at another drunkard named Don. So the plot of Charles Jackson’s The Lost Weekend goes something like this: A guy named Don gets drunk. He’s gotten drunk before. He’ll get drunk again. He drinks, passes out, wakes up; […]

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Lost & Found: Stacy Carlson on Christiane Ritter

As winter presses on, we offer a literary journey to the northern fjords of Spitsbergen, in hopes that you will feel warmer upon your return. This piece, written by Stacy Carlson, first appeared in Issue 49, The Ecstatic.  I never doubted my vocation as a writer until I set foot in the Far North. I stepped […]

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