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Tin House Galley Club: Before the Feast

We surveyed our galley club members and here are their responses.

Posted in Tin House Books

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Eleven Extraordinary Hours: An Interview with Pamela Erens

Jim Ruland talks to Pamela Erens about her new novel, Eleven Hours

Posted in Interviews, Tin House Books

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Eleven Hours: An Excerpt

No, the girl says, she will not wear the fetal monitoring belt. Her birth plan says no to fetal monitoring.

Posted in Fiction, Tin House Books

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A Public Space

Bookstores are not a dependable resource in the suburbs.

Posted in Essays, Tin House Books

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Tin House Galley Club: Eleven Hours

We surveyed our galley club members—here’s what they thought.

Posted in Tin House Books

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The 5 Best Childbirth Scenes in Contemporary Literature

So little fiction has been written about one of the most common of human experiences: childbirth.

Posted in Essays, Tin House Books

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Ghosts of Bergen County: An excerpt

There were no witnesses except the woman who’d been up all night…

Posted in Excerpts, Fiction, Tin House Books

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Six Ghost Stories

Ghosts in literature are often treated like hybrid elements: part character, part plot device, part setting.

Posted in Essays, Tin House Books

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Ghosts of Bergen County: An Interview with Dana Cann

The idea for this novel began, as many of my works begin, as a dream: a friend and I take heroin, shoplift in a mall, and are chased by store security.

Posted in Interviews, Tin House Books

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The Coyote’s Bicycle: An Excerpt

  For readers of Jon Krakauer and Susan Orlean, The Coyote’s Bicycle brings to life a never-before-told phenomenon at our southern border, and the human drama of those that would cross.   Prologue: EVERYBODY LOVES A BIKE   This is the story of several thousand bicycles that made an incredible journey. They were very ordinary, used bicycles. […]

Posted in Fiction, Tin House Books

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The Sleep Garden: An Interview with Jim Krusoe

Meg Storey: The Sleep Garden takes place mostly within an apartment complex called “The Burrow,” but a few characters do not exist in this space. Why did you choose to extend the story beyond the Burrow? Jim Krusoe: The Sleep Garden is a combination of two elements. At first, all I wanted to do was to find […]

Posted in General, Interviews, Tin House Books

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Michael: An Essay

It so happens that Michael Woodcock, whose painting St. Joseph’s Day appears as the cover of The Sleep Garden, also designed the cover of my first book of poems, a lifetime ago. It’s my hope that what follows will let others know how important he was to me and to everyone who knew him.  * […]

Posted in Essays, Tin House Books

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The Sleep Garden: An Excerpt

I • Where are we? How did we come here? Where are we going? • And anyway, who lies sleeping here with us? Wherever that is— I mean—wherever we are.   II • To begin: the Burrow is a low mound that rises out of the ground. It rests on what would be, if not […]

Posted in Fiction, Tin House Books

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The New and Improved Romie Futch: An Interview with Julia Elliott and Rachel Kaplan

Although many people see “sci-fi” and “Southern Gothic” as incompatible genres, combining the two seems natural to me because the contemporary South exists in the same technology-mediated world as other parts of the US, a world in which the internet inundates the mind with diverse forms of information and where the boundaries between science and sci-fi are often blurry.

Posted in Interviews, Tin House Books

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Jess Pane, Greenlight Bookstore

A book that I hand sell a lot is “The Boys of My Youth” by Jo Ann Beard. That book stops my heart. I have to pound my chest to get it going again.

Posted in Interviews, Tin House Books

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Winter Workshop Buoy: Lacy M. Johnson

As we continue to take applications for our upcoming fiction and nonfiction coastal workshops, we decided to check in with a few of our winter captains to get their perspective on the workshop experience. On the deck, our own Lacy M. Johnson, who will be teaching during Session Two.  Tin House: What can you tell […]

Posted in Interviews, Tin House Books, Workshops

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“Where Do You Get Your Ideas From?”

Fiction: Imagination working on experience.

Posted in Events, General, Tin House Books

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Haunted Reading

As I walked the eerily empty streets of downtown Spartanburg the evening before my reading, I imagined good old boys morphing into slimy reptiles, conducting human sacrifices, and wallowing in bloodbaths, their scales glistening with gore.

Posted in Essays, Tin House Books

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The Art of the Sentence: Padgett Powell

“The caterwauling bug song will abate as you do this.” –Padgett Powell

Posted in Art of the Sentence, Tin House Books

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The New and Improved Romie Futch: An Interview with Julia Elliott

Author Julia Elliott talks about dystopian satires, Southern gothic tall tales, brain enhancements, and fear-hog hunting in this Q&A with her editor.

Posted in Interviews, Tin House Books

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The New and Improved Romie Futch: An Excerpt

On a Friday evening in June, stoked by the awesome weather, Chip, Lee, and I were doing tequila shots on the patio of Noah’s Ark Taxidermy.

Posted in Fiction, Tin House Books

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St. Mark’s Bookshop

When I was 16 I discovered subculture and went at it voraciously.

Posted in Essays, Tin House Books

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Anmiryam Budner, Main Point Books

They are still touchstones for many women I meet; secret decoder rings of the bookish of a certain age.

Posted in Interviews, Tin House Books

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Dryland: An Interview with Sara Jaffe

Dryland launches today!

Posted in Interviews, Tin House Books

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Our Endless Numbered Days: A Summer Field Guide

How well do you think you would survive in the wild with only an axe and a knife?

Posted in Essays, Tin House Books

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