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Tin House Translation Series

No One

 A novel by Gwenaëlle Aubry 
Translated by Trista Selous, February 2012

“Gwenaëlle Aubry’s No One is a beautifully rendered and conceived work. Structured like a duet, with writing by her dead father and herself, No One is about the search for a wanderer father in the morass of his unstable identity. It is an impassioned novel, a psychoanalytic double session, an examination of the limits of language, and an act of filial devotion.” —Lynne Tillman, author of Someday This Will Be Funny

 Cleaning up her father’s home after his death, Gwenaëlle Aubry discovered a handwritten, autobiographical manuscript with a note on the cover: “to novelize.” The title was The Melancholic Black Sheep, but the subtitle An Inconvenient Specter had been crossed out. The specter? Her father’s disabling bipolar disorder. Aubry had long known that she wanted to write about her father; his death, and his words, gave her the opportunity to explain his many absences—even while he was physically present—and to sculpt her memory of him.

 

Beside the Sea

 A novel by Veronique Olmi
Translated by Adriana Hunter, October 2012

"A harrowing evocation of mental illness, and of one woman's terrifying inability to bear the burdens of motherhood. A sustained exercise in dread for the reader, but a surprisingly sympathetic portrait nonetheless." —Lionel Shriver, We Need to Talk about Kevin

 A single mother takes her two sons on a trip to the seaside. They stay in a hotel, drink hot chocolate, and go to the funfair. She wants to protect them from an uncaring and uncomprehending world. She knows that it will be the last trip for her boys. 

Beside the Sea is a haunting and thought-provoking story about how a mother's love for her children can be more dangerous than the dark world she is seeking to keep at bay. It's a hypnotizing look at an unhinged mind and the cold society that produced it. With language as captivating as the story that unfolds, Véronique Olmi creates an intimate portrait of madness and despair that won't soon be forgotten.

Welcome to Paradise

 A Novel by Mahi Binebine
Translated by Lulu Norman
Introduction by Anderson Tepper, April 2012

“A masterful account of North Africans trying to sneak across the Straits of Gibraltar into Spain . . . A fine debut: richly atmospheric and evocative, at once a sharply narrated tale of suspense and a carefully constructed memoir of inner grief.”Kirkus Reviews

 Mahi Binebine’s courageous novel takes place in Morocco, where seven would-be immigrants gather one night near the Strait of Gibraltar to wait for a signal from a trafficker that it is time to cross. While they wait, their stories unfold: Kacem Judi is an escapee from the civil war in Algeria; Nuara, with her newborn child, hopes to find her husband, who hasn’t been in touch for months since moving to France; and Aziz, the young narrator, and his cousin Reda are severed, in different ways, from their families in southern Morocco. They all share a longing to escape and a readiness to risk everything. Welcome to Paradise delves into a world that most readers know only from stories on the nightly news, delivering a compassionate and striking portrait of human desperation.

The Sickness

A novel by Alberto Barrera Tyszka 
Translated by Margaret Jull Costa, March 2012

"The Sickness is refreshingly clean in its storytelling yet very complex in character." — Times Literary Supplement

Dr. Miranda is faced with a tragedy: his father has been diagnosed with terminal cancer and has only a few weeks to live. He is also faced with a dilemma: How does one tell his father he is dying? Ernesto Duran, a patient of Dr. Miranda’s, is convinced he is sick. Ever since he separated from his wife he has been presenting symptoms of an illness he believes is killing him. It becomes an obsession far exceeding hypochondria. The fixation, in turn, has its own creeping effect on Miranda’s secretary, who cannot, despite her best intentions, resist compassion for the man. Alberto Barrera Tyszka’s tender, refined novel interweaves the stories of four individuals as they try, in their own way, to come to terms with sickness in all its ubiquity.

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  • Page Count: 1100
  • Direct Price: $40.00
  • List Price: $51.80
  • November 2012
  • TIn House Translation Series
$40.00

No One 

A novel by Gwenaëlle Aubry 
Translated by Trista Selous, February 2012

A novelist and a philosopher, Gwenaëlle Aubry studied at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris and Trinity College in Cambridge. She published her first novel, Le diable détacheur (Actes Sud), in 1999, followed in 2002 and 2003 by L’Isolée (Stock) et L'Isolement (Stock) and Notre vie s’use en transfigurations (Actes Sud, 2007), written while in residency at the Villa Medicis in Rome. She is also the author of several nonfiction works including a translation of a treatise by Plotinus. In 2009, she won the Prix Femina for No One. 

Trista Selous lives in London, where she works as a translator and teacher of French. She has published many translations and is the author of a book on the novels of Marguerite Duras. 

Beside the Sea

A novel by Veronique Olmi
Translated by Adriana Hunter, October 2012

Véronique Olmi was born in 1962 in Nice and now lives in Paris. She is a highly acclaimed French dramatist and her twelve plays have won numerous awards. Bord de Mer, published in 2001 and translated into all major European languages, was her first novel.

Adriana Hunter spent won the 2011 Scott-Moncrieff Prize for her translation of Véronique Olmi’s Bord de Mer (Beside the Sea), and has been short-listed twice for both the French-American Foundation and Florence Gould Foundation Translation Prize and the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. She lives in Norfolk, England. 

Welcome to Paradise

A Novel by Mahi Binebine
Translated by Lulu Norman
Introduction by Anderson Tepper, April 2012

Mahi Binebine was born in Marrakech in 1959. He studied in Paris and taught mathematics, until he became recognized first as a painter, then as a novelist. Binebine lived in New York in the late 1990s, when his paintings began to be acquired by the Guggenheim Museum.

Lulu Norman is a writer, translator, and editor who lives in London. She has translated Albert Cossery, Mahmoud Darwish, Tahar Ben Jelloun, and the songs of Serge Gainsbourg and written for national newspapers, the London Review of Books, and other literary journals. Her translation of Mahi Binebine’s Welcome to Paradise (Granta, 2003) was shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. Her translation of Binebine’s The Stars of Sidi Moumen will appear in 2012 (Granta, Tin House). 

The Sickness

A novel by Alberto Barrera Tyszka 
Translated by Margaret Jull Costa, March 2012

Alberto Barrera Tyszka, poet and novelist, is well known in Venezuela for his Sunday column in the newspaper El Nacional. He cowrote the internationally bestselling and critically acclaimed Hugo Chávez (2007), the first biography of the Venezuelan president. The Sickness won the prestigious Premio Herralde—an honor previously bestowed on Roberto Bolaño and Javier Marias, among others—and was shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize in 2011. 

Margaret Jull Costa is the translator of many Portuguese, Spanish, and Latin American writers, among them Javier Marías, Bernardo Atxaga, Fernando Pessoa, and Eça de Queiroz. She has won many awards, most recently, the 2011 Oxford Weidenfeld Translation Prize for José Saramago's The Elephant's Journey.