Hollywood

Issue #6, Winter 2000

Putting this mammoth issue together was something like a big-budget special-effects extravaganza—good money after bad, our regular columns and good sense tossed out the window, mistaken identity, betrayal, cryptic e-mail, heartbreak, a stick of butter, plagiarism exposed, a bicycle chase, a flood, and a small fire. Scene One: The tone of the issue is set by the great Russell Banks who holds forth on the new intelligence in films and how filmmakers have creatively adapted his own uncompromising novels into movies. Scene Two: Party Scene with Mysterious Parlor Game, in which a dashing and bewitching array of writers, producers, and directors answer five question, brilliantly dishing about the film adaptations they love and hate. We would like to invite you, after reading what nimble-witted folks such as Carrie Fisher, Buck Henry, Rick Moody, Benicio Del Toro, and Alison Maclean have to say, to please register your own loves and love-to-hates on our spanking new website. 

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Russell Banks

NO, BUT I SAW THE MOVIE • Tales of adaptation: Is American filmmaking entering a brave new world?

David Gates

NABOKOV AND HITCHCOCK • The collaboration that never was.

Bruce Wagner and William Eggleston

LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS MEN • A celebration of celebrity look-alikes, in words and photographs.

Mia Taylor

SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL • The ill-fated attempts of Polanski, Fellini, Manzarak, and a host of others to bring Bulgakov's Master and Margarita to the big screen.

Jonathan Lethem

DEFENDING THE SEARCHERS • The slings and arrows suffered for loving this classic John Wayne/John Ford Western.

Victoria Price

HENRY MILLER IN LOTOS LAND • Contemptuous of Hollywood, the uncompromising writer turned to watercolors for solace and money.

Christopher Merrill

THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE CRAFT • How artists give thanks to the muse.

Philippe Garnier

THEY MADE ME A SCREENWRITER • The 1930s screenwriters' haven known as San Quentin.

David Leavitt

LOST AMONG THE PINAFORES • This critic thinks that more than music has been lost in the film adaptation of Howards End.

Deanne Stillman

STUDIO OPTIONS DESERT, THEN DISAPPEARS • Does Tina Brown exist? Was there really a TriStar? Truth, storytelling, and the brutal murder of two girls in Twentynine Palms.

Annette Insdorf

AN EYE FOR AN I: FROM NOVELS TO FILMS • The film historian makes her case for Philip Kaufman's The Unbearable Lightness of Being.

Fred G. Leebron

WE ARE NOT FRIENDS • 'You sit back in your seats, marveling at how hard it must be to be them.'

F. Scott Fitzgerald

THE NICKEL • 'Granted your dialogue is more graceful than what these hacks can write--that's why we brought you out here.'

Katherine Vaz

THE MAN WHO WAS MADE OF NETTING • 'Every family was in an uproar about this Hollywood lottery, but Manny was calmly assured of winning.'

David St. John

ABOVE SUNSET

Ogden Nash

VIVA VAMP, VALE VAMP

Xavier Villaurrutia

L.A. NOCTURNE: THE ANGELS

Frank O'Hara

TO THE FILM INDUSTRY IN CRISIS

Daniel Halpern

CINEMA VERITÉ

David Lehman

JANUARY 25
AUGUST 13
DECEMBER 12
DECEMBER 21

Rafael Alberti

BUSTER KEATON LOOKS IN THE WOODS FOR HIS LOVE WHO IS A REAL COW

András Hamori, Interviewed by Rachel Resnick

The producer of Crash and The Sweet Hereafter on the naked truth of literary adaptations.

Jerry Stahl, Interviewed by Ann Magnuson

The acclaimed writer and former junkie talks about having his own life fictionalized.

Alex Cox, Interviewed by Lou Mathews

The exiled Hollywood director of Repo Man and Sid and Nancy is turning out his best work ever, in Mexico.

Todd Haynes, Interviewed by Jon Raymond

The director of Safe and Velvet Goldmine gets melodramatic.

F. Scott. Fitzgerald

Three previously unpublished letters from his days in Hollywood.

Patricia Bosworth

DIANE ARBUS: TWO TREATMENTS • An excerpt from Diane Arbus: A Biography, with matching excerpt from Tamara Jenkins's script-in-progress.

Barney Rosset

The founder of The Evergreen Review and the former publisher of Grove Press, on how he persuaded Samuel Beckett to make Film.

David Trinidad

On Breakfast at Tiffany's--the book, remember?

Chris Solomine

On Nikita Mikhalkov's Checkhov adaptation An Unfinished Piece for a Player Piano.

Kera Bolonik

On William Boyd's sprawling epic of filmmaking, The New Confessions.

Christopher Merrill

On Xavier Villaurrutia's Nostalgia for Death.

Steven Katz

On the deeply weird British cult classic film The Wicker Man.

Mark Caldwell

On The Egg and I's author, Betty McDonald, whose book has been overshadowed by the saccharine film adaptation.

Ron Carlson

On Monsters of Filmland, the zine that made him want to be a writer.

Anne Beatts

SAY IT AGAIN, SAM • The philosophy of everything according to the movies.