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The Willies Sold Out

Issue #7, Spring 2001

If ever there was a story to turn a man into a primate-ophile, it's Nick Tosches's strange but true report on the 1930s medical scandal in which seemingly otherwise sane men paid to have monkey glands implanted in their scrotums to enhance their virility. If ever there was an essay to get you picking at your scalp, it's Kathryn Harrison's "Nit Pickers," a first-person account of her family's run-ins with lice! lice! lice! and more lice! Mary Gaitskill, as ever, crawls under the skin in her story "Therapy," which is what one might require after reading Lydia Davis's "Letter to a Funeral Parlor." And, on the other hand, we have some awe-inspiring offerings from some of our favorite poets: James Tate, Sharon Olds, Nobel laureate Wislawa Szymborska, Diane Ackerman, as well as a remembrance of the late Yehuda Amichai by Charles Simic. The distinguished and beloved Poet Laureate Stanley Kunitz sits down with TH poetry editor Amy Bartlett and reminisces about D.H. Lawrence and other writers he has known during his ninety-five years.

Peter Rock

BLOOMS • If I could tell the librarian one story, it would be this one. And I would tell her only a little at a time, until she couldn't stand it.

Mary Gaitskill

THERAPY • She would watch with her arms folded and a look of satisfaction on her face; a decent, ordinary person entitled to her decent, ordinary hate.

Lydia Davis

LETTER TO A FUNERAL PARLOR • There is nothing wrong with inventing words, especially in a business. But grieving families are not prepared for this one.

Quintan Ana Wikswo

WHEN I WATCHED HIM HANG THE HORSE • The bones weren't scattered around. They were laid out in the pasture as neat and close as the yarn in a sweater.

Peter Vilbig

BOA • From this mess, his left and only eye stared out as if it were the one living thing in his face.

B.T. Shaw

Poetry
AFTER A FASHION
ABSENTMINDED
REMEMBERING

Debra Burns

Fiction
A MATTER OF TIME • Irregular and labored, deep and then deeper, the sound is clearly coming from the apartment across the street.

Michael Morse

MERIDETH
COME BACK AS A THRUSH

Diane Ackerman

WATERCOLOR BY PAUL KLEE
BLOOD ORANGES
THE PATH

James Tate

THE BEAUTIFUL SHOESHINE
SO MUCH ALIKE
WIND AMONG THE LEAVES

Yehuda Amichai

LIFE IS CALLED LIFE

Sharon Olds

ON THE HEARTH OF THE BROKEN HOME
AT NIGHT

Wislawa Szymborska

MIRACLE FAIR
BALL
LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT

Nick Tosches

SAM AND BILL AT THE MONKEY-GLAND CLINIC • Faulkner's affinity for minstrelsy, the blues, and the sexual elixir of monkey glands.

Charles Simic

POETRY: THE ART OF MEMORY • Remembering Yehuda Amichai.

Eric Konigsberg

COWBOY ARTISTS OF AMERICA • Behind the nation's largest and richest art market.

Kathryn Harrison

NIT PICKERS • When lice attack!!!

Jennifer Levasseur & Kevin Rabalais

CHARLES BAXTER • The master of the mundane on getting failure right.

Amy Bartlett

STANLEY KUNITZ • The ninety-five-year-old Poet Laureate's memories and passions.

Diana Abu-Jaber

BORN TO RUN • Immigrant dreaming, from the real desert of Jordan to the spiritual desert of L.A.

Robert Cohen

On Paulo Emilio Salles Gomes's P's Three Women
Love and deception - Brazilian style.

Fiona Maazel

On Humberto Constantini's The Long Night of The Francisco Sanctis
An Argentinian bureaucratic confronts his country's systematic repression in this harrowing and hilarious farce.

Mark Yates

On Bohumil Hrabal.
The Czech writer championed the ordinary and slid under the Communist radar.

Janet Fitch

On Samantha Dunn's Failing Paris
An American expat on getting it wrong in Paris. The winner of PEN-West, yet unpublished in the United States.

Shusha Guppy

PERSIAN CUISINE • In exile in London, the Iranian writer keeps a family's culinary legacy alive and cooking

Mark Statman

LOW-DOWN MEZCAL • Don't put on any airs when you're down on Rue Morgue Avenue.

Tim Geary

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS • Thank you, really.

Louise Bourgeois

PORTFOLIO