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Wild

Issue #57, Fall, 2013

In our mitigated, cultivated world, is it possible to still be wild? With no wilderness, will our natures turn tame? These are two of the challenges we threw out for our Wild issue, and because writers are creative, and therefore untamed, they came back to us with very different answers. Often the word wild is associated with otherness and primitiveness. Artist Matt Kish explores this idea in his dark, haunting interpretation of Conrad’s classic tale of madness, Heart of Darkness; Lauren Groff’s single female heroine loses herself to otherness in the story “Salvador”; and journalist Inara Verzemnieks chronicles a transient community that colonized a highway rest stop. The doggedly inquisitive Ginger Strand tackles the elusive sex trade in Vegas and traces the not-so-wild roots of the Wild West. Whatever your inclination, we hope you heed the words of Isadora Duncan: “You were once wild here. Don’t let them tame you.”

A note about the digital versions: If you read on a Kindle, use the Mobipocket edition; for all other e-readers, use the ePub edition.

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Lauren Groff

SALVADOR • Helena was in that viscous pool of years in her late thirties when she could feel her beauty slowly departing from her.

Donald Ray Pollock

THE WORM • They arose silently from their particular corners of the one-room shack and pulled on their filthy clothes.

Ben Marcus

LEAVING THE SEA • I felt the chilly finger hanging between my legs, a bit of ice high on my inner thigh, a patch of clammy coolness.

Lawrence Osborne

CAMINO REAL • Angel already looked far older than twenty-eight. Two years wandering the deserts had turned his skin a darkened copper and made his eyes harder.

Vauhini Vara

BUFFALO • That summer the days failed to distinguish themselves from one another, and given that failure, I don't see why I should do the distinguishing for them.

Olena Kalytiak Davis

THE POEM SHE DIDN'T WRITE
COMMENTARY

Natalie Eilbert

I WANT A LOVE

Rosalie Moffett

RE: GRAND THEFT AUTO 2

Albert Goldbarth

MAPPED
JUNG
MALENA
DARWIN
DETECTIVE
WOODY
SCI-FI

Kimberly Grey

SYSTEM OF BECOMING QUITE
SYSTEM OF DISMANTLING BOMB

Alice Fulton

FORCIBLE TOUCHING

Allison Titus

ESSAY ON URBAN HOMESTEADING

Patricia Spears Jones

SELF-PORTRAIT AS MIDNIGHT STORM

Mark Irwin

A FLY
PRIMER

Inara Verzemnieks

THE LAST DAYS OF THE BALDOCK • An unlikely community formed when several people with nowhere else to go pulled into a highway rest stop and parked. For good.

Matt Kish

HEART OF DARKNESS • The acclaimed illustrator has become obsessed with obsession. After finishing Moby-Dick in Pictures, he set his sights on Conrad's masterpiece.

Ginger Strand

COMPANY TOWN • A tour of Vegas brothels prompts the author to ask: How 'wild' is the Wild West, really?

Rilla Askew

RHUMBA • Snakes above the plains.

Ursula K. Le Guin

ON H.L. DAVIS'S Honey in the HornDon't dare call this overlooked masterpiece, set in Oregon, 'regional.' Them's fightin' words.

Nathan Alling Long

ON MARILYN HACKER'S Love, Death, and the Changing of the SeasonsThis series of witty, bawdy poems reads like a novel and teaches us a great deal about love and lust.

Emma Komlos-Hrobsky

ON ROSEMARIE WALDROP'S A Form / Of Taking / It AllIn style and scope, this book offers a big 'fuck you' to constraining ideas of female domesticity.

David Varno

ON JANET FRAME'S Faces in the WaterDebunking the popular romantic idea that insanity is immediately poetic.

Aspen Matis

ON JOHN MUIR'S Travels in AlaskaIn the wake of a tragedy, the author made the most impulsive decision of her life: to hike the entire Pacific Coast Trail.

Jeff Koehler

PERCEBES • Spain's Coast of Death is home to a recalcitrant delicacy.